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Buddhism complete d essay in suzuki t works zen

T Suzuki explains how Zen has its origins in the enlightenment of the Buddha while its central fact is attaining 'Satori', an intuitional understanding of the truth of Zen. He explains how Satori can be attained, and the methods that are needed to bring it about. In this collection of his most important essays he explores the history of Buddhism, the daily life of a Zen monk and the path to enlightenment. Essays on Zen Buddhism is a meditation on the meaning of existence as well as a critical account of Buddhism. Convert currency. Add to Basket.

Book Description Rider. Condition: New. As the war progressed, so did the extravagance of some of Suzuki's claims. In , for example, between trips to the air-raid shelter, Suzuki wrote a book called Japanese Spirituality , which argued that true Zen is not a product of China, much less India, but rather emerged out of the meeting of Buddhism and Japanese culture in the Kamakura period. Suzuki was fully aware of the Indian and Chinese roots of Zen, having written extensively on the topic, but here he insists that true Zen is not a "natural expression" of those cultures, and thus it was not until Zen came to Japan that it was fully realized.

Besides, in Suzuki's mind Zen had long since disappeared on the continent.


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  • Essays in Zen Buddhism, First Series by D.T. Suzuki!

In so far as such statements would have lent credibility to Japan's sense of spiritual mission in Asia, Suzuki could understandably be construed as supporting the ongoing military campaign. After the Japanese defeat, Suzuki claimed to have been opposed to the war; he said that he believed losing the war was in Japan's own best interests. Private letters to friends written prior to the war substantiate Suzuki's claims: they express his reservations about Japanese militarism, and his disgust with excessive public displays of patriotic zeal. Nevertheless, some Japanese intellectuals such as Umehara Takeshi — took umbrage with Suzuki: if Suzuki was so opposed to the war effort, why did he — a student of Zen who claimed to have attained satori — not speak out openly?

Be that as it may, Suzuki's lifelong effort to impart his love of Zen and Japanese culture must be deemed a resounding success. Following the war he continued to travel to Europe and America, sometimes for extended periods of time. He was a popular lecturer, speaking at college campuses around the world, and from to he held a series of professorships at Columbia University. And he was, above all else, an indefatigable writer, producing over thirty volumes in English and even more in Japanese. Whereas much of Suzuki's writings were intended for a popular audience, he did make substantial contributions to Buddhist scholarship.

Suzuki's work made a significant impact not only among those interested in the study of religion, but also among theologians, philosophers, writers, artists, and musicians. By the s there seem to have been relatively few of the latter, as is evident from the flattering profile of Suzuki in the August 31, , issue of the New Yorker.

His influence on the beat poets is well known. Suzuki , the German philosopher Martin Heidegger — remarked, "If I understand this man correctly, this is what I have been trying to say in all my writings" Barrett, , p. Suzuki's English works, such as Zen and Japanese Culture first published as Zen Buddhism and Its Influence on Japanese Culture , — a book that unapologetically celebrates the unique spiritual gifts of the Japanese and the sublime affinity between Zen and Japanese martial culture — continue to capture the imagination of new generations of readers.

Whereas more traditional Zen teachers may dismiss Suzuki for his intellectualism or for his lack of proper Zen credentials, they have Suzuki to thank for the currency of Zen in the West. Abe Masao. A Zen Life: D.


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Suzuki Remembered. New York , Barrett, William. Zen Buddhism: Selected Writings of D. Faure, Bernard. Princeton, Sharf, Robert H. Lopez, Jr. Chicago, Thus: Om, the seer, the world-transcending one! O Hari the Mahabodhisattva! All, all! Defilement, defilement! The earth, the earth!

It is the heart. Do, do the work! Hold fast, hold fast! O great victor! Hold on, hold on! I hold on. To Indra the creator I Move, move, my defilement-free seal! Come, come! Hear, hear! A joy springs up in me! Speak, speak! Hulu, hulu, mala, hulu, hulu, hile! Sara, Sara! Be awakened, be awakened!

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Have awakened, have awakened! O merciful one, blue-necked one! Of daring ones, to the joyous, hail! To the successful one, hail! To the great successful one, hail! To the one who has attained mastery in the discipline, hail! To the blue-necked one, hail! To the boar-faced one, hail! To the one with a lion's head and face, hail!

To the one who holds a weapon in his hand, hail! To the one who holds a wheel in his hand, hail! To the one who holds a lotus in his hand, hail! To the blue-necked far-causing one, hail! To the beneficent one referred to in this Dharani beginning with "Namah," hail! Adoration to Avalokiteshvara! May these [prayers] be successful!

To this magical formula, hail! Adoration to the Blessed One who is the most excellent one in the triple world! Adoration to the Enlightened One, to the Blessed One! Cleanse [us], cleanse [us]! O one who is always impartial! One who, being in possession of all-pervading, all-illuminating light, is pure in his self-nature, cleansed of the darkness of the five paths of existence!

Baptize us, O Sugata, with an immortal baptism which consists of the best words, of the great true phrases! Remove disasters, remove disasters, O one who holds an eternal life! Cleanse us, cleanse us, O one who is as pure as the sky! O one who is as pure as the victorious Buddha-crown! O one who is inflamed with a thousand rays of light!

O all the Tathagatas who look over [the entire world]! O one who is perfect in the Six Paramitas! O one who holds the great seal empowered with the spiritual power which emanates from the heart of every Tathagata! O one whose body is as hard and pure as Vajra! O one who is thoroughly pure, cleansed of all impediments, all fears, and all the evil paths! Turn us away [from evils] O one who enjoys a purified life!

O one who empowers us with [the power of] the original covenant! O jewel, jewel, the great jewel! O Suchness which is reality-limit and absolute purity! O one who is pure in his evolved enlightenment! Be victorious, be victorious, be ever victorious, be ever victorious! Bear in mind, bear in mind!

O one who is pure being empowered by all Buddhas! O Vajragarbha who holds the Vajra! Let my body be like Vajra! Let those of all beings too be like Vajra! O one who is in possession of an absolutely pure body! O one who is absolutely pure from all the paths of existence! And let me be consoled by all the Tathagatas! O one who is empowered with the consoling power of all the Tathagatas!

Be enlightened, be enlightened, be ever enlightened, be ever enlightened! Have them enlightened, have them enlightened, have them ever enlightened, have them ever enlightened! O one who is most pure in a most thoroughgoing way! O one who holds a great seal empowered with the spiritual power which emanates from the heart of every Tathagata! The sutras most read in Zen are the Shingyo Prajnaparamitahridaya , the Kwannongyo Samantamukha-parivarta , and the Kongokyo Vajracchedika.

The Shingyo being the shortest is read on almost all occasions. The Ryoga Lankavatara is historically significant, but being difficult to understand is very little studied nowadays by followers of Zen. For further information see the author's works on the sutra. The Ryogon Suramgama is not so neglected as the Ryoga. It is full of deep thoughts, and was studied very much more in China than in Japan. There are some more sutras of the Mahayana school with which Zen students will do well to become better acquainted, for example, the Kongosammaikyo Vajrasamadhi , the Yengakukyo Sutra of Perfect Enlightenment , the Yuimakyo Vimalakirti-sutra , and the Hannyakyo Prajnaparamita.

None of them have been translated into English, except the Yuima which is difficult to obtain now. When[1] the Bodhisattva Avalokiteshvara was engaged in the practice of the deep Prajnaparamita, he perceived that there are the five Skandhas;[2] and these he saw in their self-nature to be empty. The same can be said of sensation, thought, confection, and consciousness.

All the Buddhas of the past, present, and future, depending on the Prajnaparamita, attain to the highest perfect enlightenment. It runs: 'Gate, gate, Paragate, parasamgate, bodhi, svaha! The one printed above is the shorter sutra in general use in Japan and China. The opening passage in the larger text in Sanskrit and Tibetan, which is missing in the shorter one, is as follows: [The Tibetan has this additional passage: "Adoration to the Prajnaparamita, which is beyond words, thought, and praise, whose.

Max Muller's rendering, "envelop", is not good. At one time World-honored One dwelt at Rajagriha, on the Mount of the Vulture, together with a large number of Bhikshus and a large number of Bodhisattvas. And at the same moment the Great Bodhisattva Aryavalokitesvara was practicing himself in the deep Prajnaparamita. At that moment, the World-honored One rose from the Samadhi and gave approval to the Great Bodhisattva Aryavalokitesvara, saying: Well done, well done, noble son! As it has been preached by you, it is applauded by Tathagatas and Arhats.

Thus spoke the World-honored One with joyful heart. The venerable Shariputra and the Great Bodhisattva Aryavalokitesvara together with the whole assemblage, and the world of Gods, Men, Asuras, and Gandharvas, all praised the speech of the World-honored One. At that time Mujinni[2] Bosatsu rose from his seat, and, baring his right shoulder, turned, with his hands folded, towards the Buddha, and said this: World-honoured One, for what reason is Kwanzeon Bosatsu so named?

The Buddha said to Mujinni Bosatsu: Good man, when those innumerable numbers of beings--hundred-thousands of myriads of kotis of them--who are suffering all kinds of annoyances, hearing of this Kwanzeon Bosatsu, will utter his name with singleness of mind, they will instantly hear his voice and be released. Even when people fall into a great fire, if they hold the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu, the fire will not scorch them because of the spiritual power of this Bosatsu.

When they are. Its Sanskrit title is Samantamukha Parivarta. It is one of the most popular sutras in Japan, especially among followers of the Holy Path, including Zen, Tendai, Shingon, Nichiren, etc. The Sanskrit for Kwannon seems, according to some Japanese authorities, originally to have been Avalokitasvara , and not Avalokitesvara. The Bodhisattva Avalokitasvara is "the owner of voice which is viewed or heard". From him issues a voice which is variously heard and interpreted by all beings, and it is by this hearing that the latter are emancipated from whatever troubles they are in.

The present translation is from Kumarajiva's Chinese. In the reading of the proper names, the Japanese way of pronunciation has been retained. When hundred-thousands of myriads of kotis of people go out into the great ocean in order to seek such treasures as gold, silver, lapis lazuli, conch shells, cornelian, coral, amber, pearls, and other precious stones, their boats may be wrecked by black storms, and they may find themselves thrown up into the island of the Rakshasas; if among them there is even a single person who will utter the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu all the people will be released from the disaster [which is likely to befall them at the hand] of the Rakshasas.

For this reason the Bosatsu is called Kwanzeon. When, again, a man is about to suffer an injury, if he will utter the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu, the sword or the stick that is held [by the executioner] will be at once broken to pieces and the man be released. When all the Yakshas and Rakshasas filling the three thousand chiliocosms come and annoy a man, they may hear him utter the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu, and no wicked spirits will dare look at him with their evil eyes, much less inflict injuries on him.

When again a man, whether guilty or innocent, finds himself bound in chains or held with manacles, he uttering the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu will see all these broken to pieces and be released. When all the lands in the three thousand chiliocosms are filled with enemies, a merchant and his caravan loaded with precious treasures may travel through the dangerous passes. One of the company will say to the others: "O good men, have no fear; only with singleness of thought utter the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu. As this Bosatsu gives us fearlessness, utter his name and you will be delivered from your enemies.

O Mujinni, such is the awe-inspiring spiritual power of Kwanzeon Bosatsu Makasatsu. When people are possessed of excessive lust, let them always reverentially think of Kwanzeon Bosatsu and they will be freed from it. If they are possessed of excessive anger, let them always reverentially think of Kwanzeon Bosatsu, and they will be freed from it.

When they are possessed of excessive folly let them always reverentially think of Kwanzeon Bosatsu, and they will be freed from it. O Mujinni, of such magnitude is his spiritual power which is full of blessings. Therefore, let all beings always think of him.

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If a woman desire a male child, let her worship and make offerings to Kwanzeon Bosatsu, and she will have a male child fully endowed with bliss and wisdom. If she desire a female child, she will have one graceful in features and in possession of all the characteristics of noble womanhood], and because of her having planted the root of merit the child will be loved and respected by all beings.

O Mujinni, such is the power of Kwanzeon Bosatsu. If all beings worship and make offerings to Kwanzeon Bosatsu, they will derive benefits unfailingly from this. Therefore, let all beings hold the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu. O Mujinni, if there is a man who holds the names of all the Bodhisattvas equal in number to sixty-two billion times as many as the sands of the Ganga, and till the end of his life makes them offerings of food and drink, clothing and bedding and medicine, what do you think?

Is not the merit accumulated by such a man very great? The Buddha said: Here is another man; if he should hold the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu even for a while and make offerings to the Bosatsu, the merit so attained by this one is fully equal to that [of the previous one], and will not be exhausted even to the end of hundred-thousands of myriads of kotis of kalpas. Those who hold the name of Kwanzeon Bosatsu gain such immeasurable and innumerable masses of blissful merit.

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The Buddha said to Mujinni Bosatsu: O good man, if there are beings in any country who are to be saved by his assuming a Buddha-form, Kwanzeon Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Buddha and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Pratyekabuddha-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Pratyekabuddha and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Sravaka-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Sravaka and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Brahma-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Brahma and preach them the Dharma.

If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Sakrendra-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Sakrendra and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming an Isvara-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of an Isvara and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Mahesvara-form, he will manifest himself in the form of a Mahesvara and preach them the Dharma.

If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Chakravartin-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Chakravartin and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Vaisravana-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Vaisravana and preach them the Dharma.

If beings are to be saved by his assuming the form of a Provincial chief, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a provincial chief and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a householder's form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a householder and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a lay-disciple's form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a lay-disciple and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a state-officer's form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a state-officer and preach them the Dharma.

If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Brahman-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself to them in the form of a Brahman and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Bhikshu-form, or a Bhikshuni-, or an Upasaka-, or an Upasika-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a Bhikshu, or a Bhikshuni, or an Upasaka, or an Upasika, and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a female form of the family of a householder, or a lay-disciple, or a state-officer, or a Brahman, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of such a female and preach them the Dharma.

If beings are to be saved by his assuming a youth- or a maiden-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of a youth or a maiden and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Deva-, Naga-, Yaksha-, Gandharva-, Asura-, Garuda-, Kinnara-, Mahoraga-, Manushya-, or Amanushya-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in any of these forms and preach them the Dharma. If beings are to be saved by his assuming a Vajrapani-form, the Bosatsu will manifest himself in the form of Vajrapani and preach them the Dharma.

O Mujinni, this Kwanzeon Bosatsu performs such meritorious deeds by assuming varieties of forms, and by visiting different lands saves and releases beings. Therefore, you will make offerings with singleness of thought to Kwanzeon Bosatsu. In the midst of fears, perils, and disasters, it is he who gives us fearlessness,[1] and for this reason he is called in this Saha world the one who gives fearlessness. So saying, he took off his necklace strung with all kinds of precious gems worth hundreds of thousands of gold pieces, and presented it to Kwanzeon Bosatsu with this word: Venerable Sir, accept this necklace of precious gems as a Dharma offering.

Kwanzeon Bosatsu refused to accept it, whereupon Mujinni said to him: Venerable Sir, Pray accept this out of compassion for us all. Then because of his compassion for all the four classes of beings and for Devas, Nagas, Manushyas, Amanushyas and others, Kwanzeon Bosatsu accepted the necklace, and dividing it into two parts he presented the one to Shakamunibutsu Shakyamuni Buddha and the other to the shrine of Tahobutsu Prabhutaratna Buddha. O Mujinni, Kwanzeon Bosatsu who is the possessor of such a miraculous spiritual power, visits in this wise this Saha world.

O World-honored One who is in possession of exquisite features, I now again ask him: For what reason is the son of the Buddha called Kwanzeon? The Honoured One in possession of exquisite features answered Mujinni in verse: just listen to the life of Kwanzeon! He is always ready to respond to calls from all quarters. His universal vows are as deep as the ocean. For ages beyond conception, he has served myriads of Buddhas and made great vows of purity. I will briefly tell you about them. When people hear his name and see his body and think of him in their minds not vainly, they will see every form of ill effaced in all the worlds.

Essays in Zen Buddhism, second series (The Complete Works of D. T. Suzuki)

If an enemy wishing to harm a man pushes him down to a pit of great fire, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon and the fiery pit will be transformed into a pond. Or if drifting in the vast ocean a man is about to be swallowed up by the Nagas, fishes, or evil beings, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and the waves will not drown him. Or if from the top of Mount Sumeru a man is hurled down by an enemy, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and he will stay in the air like the sun.

Or if pursued by wicked persons a man falls on the Vajra mountain, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and not a hair on him will be injured. Or if surrounded by an army of enemies a man is threatened by them, each of whom with a sword in hand is about to injure him, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and the enemies will cherish a compassionate heart.

Or if persecuted by a tyrant a man is about to end his life at the place of execution, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and the executioner's sword will at once be broken to pieces. Or if a man should find himself imprisoned and enchained with his hands and feet manacled and fettered, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and he will be released from the shackles. If harm is going to be done to a man by means of magic or poisonous herbs, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and the curse will revert to the people from whom it started. Or if a man should encounter a party of Rakshasas, or Nagas exhaling poison, or evil spirits, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and no harm will ever be done to him.

If a man is surrounded by wild beasts whose sharp teeth and claws are to be dreaded, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and they will quickly run away in all directions. If a man is attacked by venomous snakes and scorpions breathing poisonous gas ready to scorch him, let his thought the power of Kwannon, and they will all turn away from him shrieking. When thunder-clouds burst with flashes of lightning, a storm of hailstones or pouring rain in torrents, thought dwell on the power of Kwannon and the storm will in no time clear away.

If a calamity falls on beings and they are tortured with interminable pain, [let them resort to] Kwannon who, being endowed with the mysterious power of wisdom, will save them from all troubles in the world. Kwannon is the possessor of miraculous powers, widely disciplined in knowledge and skilful means, and in all the lands of the ten quarters there is not a place where he does not manifest himself.

The various evil paths of existence such as hells, evil spirits, beastly creatures, etc. He is a pure, spotless light and, like the sun, dispels all darkness with wisdom, and also subverts the disastrous effects of wind and fire; his all-illuminating light fills the world. His body of love he keeps under control like thunder that shakes the world; his thought of compassion resembles a great mass of cloud from which a rain of the Dharma comes down like nectar, destroying the flames of evil passions.

If a man is held at court with a case against him, or if he is intimidated at a military camp, let his thought dwell on the power of Kwannon, and all his enemies will beat retreat. For this reason let our thought always dwell on him. Let us never cherish thoughts of doubt about Kwanzeon who is thoroughly pure and holy and is really a refuge and protector in trouble, grief, death, and disaster.

He is in possession of all merits, regards all things with an eye of compassion, and like the ocean holds in himself an inestimable mass of virtues. For this reason he is to be adored. At that time Jiji Bosatsu[1] rose from his seat, and standing before the Buddha said: World-honored One, they are truly furnished with no small amount of merit who listen to his Chapter on Kwanzeon Bosatsu, in which his life of perfect activities is described--the life of one who endowed with miraculous powers, manifests himself in all directions. When the Buddha finished preaching this Chapter on the All-sided One all the people in the assembly, amounting to 84, in number, cherished the desire for the supreme enlightenment with which there is nothing to compare.

When the meal time came the World-honored One put on his cloak and, holding his bowl, entered the great city of Shravasti, where he begged for food. Having finished his begging from door to door, he came back to his own place, and took his meal. The full title in Sanskrit is Vajracchedika-prajna-paramita-sutra. It belongs to the Prajna class of Mahayana literature. Those who are not accustomed to this kind of reasoning may wonder what is the ultimate signification of all these negations. The Prajna dialectic means to lead us to a higher affirmation by contradicting a simple direct statement.

It differs from the Hegelian in its directness and intuitiveness. When this was done, he put away his cloak and bowl, washed his feet, spread his seat, and sat down. World-honored One, in case good men and good women ever raise the desire for the Supreme Enlightenment, how would they abide in it? The Buddha said: "Well said, indeed, O Subhuti!

As you say, the Tathagata thinks very much of all the Bodhisattvas, and so instructs them well. But now listen attentively and I will tell you. In case good men and good women raise the desire for the Supreme Enlightenment, they should thus abide in it, they should thus keep their thoughts under control. Subhuti, a Bodhisattva should cherish only that which is taught to him. According to the Tathagata, a body-form is not a body-form.

The Buddha said to Subhuti, "All that has a form is an illusive existence. When it is perceived that all form is no-form, the Tathagata is recognized. The Buddha said to Subhuti: "Do not talk that way. In the last five hundred years after the passing of the Tathagata, there may be beings who, having practiced rules of morality and, being thus possessed of merit, happen to hear of these statements and rouse a true faith in them. Such beings, you must know, are those who have planted their root of merit not only under one, two, three, four, or five Buddhas, but already under thousands of myriads of asamkhyeyas of Buddhas have they planted their root of merit of all kinds.

Those who hearing these statements rouse even one thought. Dharma, that is, the object of manovijnana , thought, as form rupa is the object of the visual sense, sound that of the auditory sense, odor that of the olfactory sense, and so forth. Because all these beings are free from the idea of an ego, a person, a being, or a soul; they are free from the idea of a dharma as well as from that of a no-dharma. Because if they cherish in their minds the ,idea of a form, they are attached to an ego, a person, a being, or a soul.

If they cherish the idea of a dharma, they are attached to an ego, a person, a being, or a soul.

jc-search.com/includes/2019-01-09/kapy-san-diego.php If they cherish the idea of a no-dharma, they are attached to an ego, a person, a being, or a soul. Therefore, do not cherish the idea of a dharma, nor that of a no-dharma. For this reason, the Tathagata always preaches thus: 'O you Bhikshus, know that my teaching is to be likened unto a raft. Even a dharma is cast aside, much more a no-dharma.

Subhuti said: "World-honored One, as I understand the teaching of the Buddha, there is no fixed doctrine about which the Tathagata would preach. Because the doctrine he preaches is not to be adhered to, nor is it to be preached about; it is neither a dharma nor a no-dharma. Because all wise men belong to the category known as non-doing asamskara , and yet they are distinct from one another.

Because their merit is characterized with the quality of not being a merit. Therefore, the Tathagata speaks of the merit as being great. If again there is a man who, holding even the four lines in this sutra, preaches about it to Others, his merit will be superior to the one just mentioned.

Because, Subhuti, all the Buddhas and their supreme enlightenment issue from this sutra.

Simple Lessons in Zen from Master D. T. Suzuki

Subhuti, what is known as the teaching of the Buddha is not the teaching of the Buddha. Subhuti said: "No, World-honored One, he does not. Because while Srotaapanna means 'entering the stream' there is no entering here. He is called a Srotaparma who does not enter [a world of] form, sound, odor, taste, touch, and quality. Does a Sakridagamin think in this wise, 'I have obtained the fruit of a Sakridagamin'? Because while Sakridagamin means 'going-and-coming for once', there is really no going-and-coming here, and he is then called a Sakridagamin.

Does an Anagamin think in this wise: 'I have obtained the fruit of an Anagamin'? Because while Anagamin means 'not-coming' there is really no not-coming and therefore he is called an Anagamin. Because there is no dharma to be called Arhat. If, World-honored One, an Arhat thinks in this wise: 'I have obtained Arhatship,' this means that he is attached to an ego, a person, a being, or a soul. Although the Buddha says that I am the foremost of those who have attained Aranasamadhi,[1] that I am the foremost of those Arhats who are liberated from evil desires, World-honored One, I cherish no such thought that I have attained Arhatship.

World-honored One, [if I did,] you would not tell me: 'O Subhuti,. That is, Samadhi of non-resistance. Arana also means a forest where the Yogin retires to practice his meditation. The Tathagata while with Dipankara Buddha had no attainment whatever the Dharma. Because to set a Buddha-land in array is not to set it in array, and therefore it is known as setting it in array. Therefore, Subhuti, all the Bodhisattva-Mahasattvas should thus rouse a pure thought. They should not cherish any thought dwelling on form; they should -not cherish any thought dwelling on sound, odor, taste, touch, and quality; they should cherish thoughts dwelling on nothing whatever.

Subhuti, it is like unto a human body equal in size to Mount Sumeru; what do you think? Is not this body large? Subhuti said: "Very large indeed, World-honored One. Because the Buddha teaches that that which is no-body is known as a large body. Subhuti, I will truly ask you now. If there is a good man or a good woman who, filling all the worlds in the three thousand chiliocosms--all the worlds as many as the sands of these Ganga rivers--with the seven precious treasures, Uses them all for charity, would not this merit be very large? Buddha said to Subhuti: "If a good man or a good woman holding even four lines from this sutra preach it to others, this merit is much larger than the preceding one.

The Buddha said to Subhuti: "This sutra will be called the Vajra-prajna-paramita , and by this title you will hold it. The reason is, Subhuti, that, according to the teaching of the Buddha, Prajnaparamita is not Prajnaparamita and therefore it is called Prajnaparamita. Subhuti, what do you think? Is there anything about which the Tathagata preaches? Subhuti said to the Buddha: "World-honored One, there is nothing about which the Tathagata preaches.

Are there many particles of dust in the three thousand chiliocosms? Is the Tathagata to be recognized by the thirty-two marks [of a great man]? Subhuti, if there be a good man or a good woman who gives away his or her lives as many as the sands of the Ganga, his or her merit thus gained does not exceed that of one who, holding even one gatha of four lines from this sutra, preaches them for others.

Because they will have no idea of an ego, of a person, of a being, or of a soul.

“The ego-shell in which we live is the hardest thing to outgrow.”

For what reason? The idea of an ego is no-idea [of ego], the idea of a person, a being, or a soul is no-idea [of a person, a being, or a soul]. They are Buddhas who are free from all kinds of ideas. The Buddha said to Subhuti, "It is just as you say. If there be a man who, listening to this sutra, is neither frightened nor alarmed nor disturbed, you should know him as a wonderful person.

Subhuti, it is taught by the Tathagata that the first Paramita is no-first-Paramita and therefore it is called the first Paramita. Subhuti, the Paramita of humility patience is said by the Tathagata to be no-Paramita of humility, and therefore it is the Paramita of humility.